Category Archives for "Uncategorized"

Jan 05

Why Geothermal Heat Pump Is the Most Cost-Effective Heating System for Your Home

By Robert Perez | Uncategorized

Geothermal heat pumps perform the task of heating and cooling a home more efficiently than other available options like gas and oil furnaces. Despite incurring high up-front installation costs, homeowners get to enjoy the long-term benefits that accompany this heating system. Other than merely heating a home using lesser energy, geothermal heat pumps can also lower reliance on fossil fuels and release warm water when in cooling mode. These benefits have earned this heating system a significant fraction of loyal clients. Even though they can cut energy costs by up to 80%, geothermal heating, and cooling systems do not have an appealing market acceptance.

Why Geothermal Heat Pump Is the Most Cost-Effective Heating System for Your HomeThe geothermal heat pumps have a small market share. This share is steadily growing even though the pump has not yet found its way into the international markets. Recent studies indicate that the market share in North American industrial buildings grew at an annual rate of 7.8% since 2012. The figure is 4.7% higher than the entire North American climate control market. Other studies indicated that there was less than 5% growth in sales in the period between 2013 and 2015. This is however followed by a drastic 20% to 30% growth between 2016 and 2018. The latter is less optimistic for the short-term but more favorable for the medium and long-term range.

Geothermal heat pumps are more economical, except for those areas that have trouble during installation. These include locations with super-insulated homes and places that experience moderate climates. This is despite advancements in Air Source Heat Pump technology, perceived to be a threat for the geothermal heat pumps. GHPs can supply warm water even as it cools, and is tolerable to harsh weather conditions like cold and snow. On the other hand, ASHPs easily default upon exposure to sudden environmental changes.

Geothermal heat pumps are advantageous under such circumstance. Unlike the Air Source Heat Pumps, Geothermal Heat Pumps do not need digging out after a snowstorm. However, if two pumps are placed side by side and both operating simultaneously, one pump would not perform optimally as one pump directly blows warm air to the other. Even though the pros outshine cons, GHP sales are still lower than expected.

The air source heat pump has received greater recommendations to numerous net zero homes. Net-Zero Home specialists including Marc Rosenbaum raised hackles by offering the same recommendations, relating to the story of Putney School’s sixteen thousand square-foot Net Zero Field House. The designing team utilized GHPs to model its cost, together with ASHPs and extrasolar photovoltaics enough to offer additional electricity required to run the ASHPs. They realized that the installation of geothermal heat pumps was more expensive than expanding the solar system to power the air source heat pumps. Additionally, solar prices have dropped since the establishment of the Putney Field House.

Nonetheless, Net Zero homes do not directly affect geothermal heat pumps market rates. This is because Net Zero homes are an exception and not the determinant factor for the market. Lower heating loads mean lower efficiency for the geothermal heat pumps, which in turn makes it difficult to repay for extra installation costs.

Dec 03

Know These Pros and Cons Before You Decide On Geothermal Heat Pumps

By Robert Perez | Uncategorized

Other than purchasing a home, investing in geothermal heating systems is one of the greatest investment decisions you have to make. There are many ways of heating and cooling a home. Each type of heating system has its unique characteristics and requirements. Before you even think of investing in this home heating and cooling system, you need to ensure that you meet certain criteria. These include making sure your home is situated in a location with the right characteristics, and you have the right financial backing to help cater for the huge up-front price tag. GHPs come in handy if you need to replace your existing heating system, you are building a new home, or you simply need to find an environmentally friendly yet efficient heating and cooling unit regardless of the price. Therefore, you need to know these pros and cons before you decide to settle for geothermal heat pumps.

Know These Pros and Cons Before You Decide On Geothermal Heat PumpsPros of Geothermal Systems

  • This home heating system can generate close to six times the amount of heat energy produced by an electrical heating system. This therefore saves in the heating mode by up to 75% of the costs incurred for electrical heating and cooling systems. A standard 1500sq foot house fitted with a geothermal heating and cooling unit costs between $30 and $50 per month.
  • Geothermal heating and cooling units have few moving parts. This minimizes on the rate of failures and maintenance, thus increasing reliability. Unlike central AC systems, geothermal systems have no outdoor sections; therefore, the homeowner does not need to worry about wear and tear outside. This additionally encourages the systems to last longer than other home heating systems.
  • The functionality of geothermal heat pumps is flexible enough and can multitask. The system can be fitted to supply warm water to one room while heating and cooling the other remaining surfaces. The warm water is supplied throughout the home at no additional costs, allowing you to comfortably heat a pool.
  • This is a renewable source of energy for air conditioning, heating, and cooling. Additionally, GHPs do not pollute the environment even to the slightest measure. This is also accompanied by the minimum to no noise emissions both within and without the premises. These heating and cooling units do not contribute to global warming. You can, therefore, live in your premise with peace of mind.

Cons of Geothermal Systems

  • High installation costs. The initial installation of geothermal heat pumps is very costly. The standard installation costs for a typical home in the U.S. vary from $5,000 to $20,000. This amount is sufficient to conduct numerous energy efficient upgrades within the home for many years to come. GHPs are therefore not recommended for leaky homes that are poorly insulated.
  • Incompatible with existing heating and cooling systems. In case your home has a heating and cooling system in place, you may need to get rid of the entire system before upgrading to a Geothermal home heating and cooling system. This is because conventional home heating systems utilize more energy compared to GHPs, thus likely to bring complications to

Despite the fact that the advantages outnumber disadvantages, the initial installation costs of this home heating system greatly discourage many homeowners from considering GHPs as a suitable option.

Nov 26

Pro Tips on How to Select the Most Efficient Electric Furnace

By Robert Perez | Uncategorized

Different furnaces use various sources of fuel for heating and distributing warm air throughout the home. An electric furnace, in this case, utilizes electricity as its only source of fuel. Electric furnaces are more advantageous than oil and gas furnaces.  Even though they transform 100% of electricity intake into heat, they are more expensive because electricity costs are constantly on the rise. Whereas every electrical furnace brand is highly efficient, HVAC specialists state that there is no worse or better option when it comes to choosing an electric furnace. Here are some pro tips on how to select the most efficient electric furnace for your home.

  • Most Efficient Electric FurnaceElectric Furnace’s cost

The average up-front electric furnace cost range between $600 and $700. The entire installation process of an electric furnace is at a standard cost of $2,000. Whereas these costs are deemed lower compared to gas and oil furnaces, the operational costs of electric furnaces vary from one location to the other. Additionally, this estimate is also complemented by the cost of electricity in your geographical position. You can, therefore, establish a cost estimate for operating your electric furnace by simply multiplying the use of kilowatts per hour in your home with cost per kilowatt. This helps to determine the estimate for heating your home every hour.

  • Types Of Electrical Furnaces

Electric furnaces come in a variety of sizes and shapes. Additionally, numerous fuel furnaces utilize some element of an electric furnace. For instance, oil-electric furnaces utilize electricity in heating homes. The oil element only kicks in when there is a need for more heat in the home. This helps to reduce the cost of electricity. Additionally, an electric furnace often pairs with the air handler, heat pump, or simply included as the heating element to an air conditioner.

  • Pros And Cons

When selecting the most efficient electric furnace for your home, you need to weigh the various advantages and disadvantages. For instance, electrical furnaces offer clean-heating operations compared to gas or oil heating furnaces, and are much safer to use. Many homeowners prefer this system because they have lower upfront costs, backed up with the wide availability of electricity even in remote locations.

  • Installation Processes Involved

Sizing and installation of electrical furnaces are keys to greater performance. The proper sizing and installation of the furnace in a home assures the homeowner of longevity and maximum productivity. You can find an electric furnace that fits properly in your home by using a standard calculation procedure for sizing an oil or gas furnace. Additionally, ensure you contract an HVAC specialist to undertake a load calculation to determine the accurate unit-size ideal for your home.

  • How It Works

Electrical furnaces use internal blowers to move air over electric resistance coils or heating elements. The element’s size is based on power consumption. The heating components often activate in stages to prevent an overload to the electrical unit. Nonetheless, electric furnaces also depend on ductworks to supply heat to the entire home.

Every electric furnace converts fuel into heat and distributes it effectively through the entire home. The variance in functionality come about because of the homeowners’ preferences on how they want to heat their homes.

Sep 20

The Ultimate Heat Pump Buying Guide

By Robert Perez | Uncategorized

In case you’re thinking about buying a heat pump this year, this guide is intended to help you pick the right model for heating your home. We recommend you have an HVAC company check your system first.

There are four different types of heat pumps, and they are:

  1. Absorption heat pumps

These types of heat pumps are mainly driven by a heat source like propane gas, natural gas, or solar-heated water. In the past, they are widely popular in industrial buildings but have lately become the most common source of heat for larger residential homes.

  1. Geothermal heat pumps

GHPs or Geothermal heat pumps heat and cool houses by absorbing the naturally existing heat in the earth’s interior, which is a reliable, clean, and sustainable source of power.

The ground underneath the earth stays at a moderately steady temperature, so GHPs interchange heat with the earth through a ground heat exchanger laid underground close to your home. Despite the fact that the installation cost of a GHP is significantly higher compared to other systems, this can be considered as an investment which will be gained back as energy savings.

  1. Ductless mini-split heat pumps

Ductless and mini-split heat pumps are individual units that can be wall mounted and utilized for certain rooms. The foremost benefit is that they don’t necessitate ducts to pass heat into rooms, and are much more adaptable than other systems. They are also faster to install than other systems and prevent unnecessary energy losses since they have no ducts.

  1. Air-source heat pumps

The air-source pump is the most common type of heat pump, and it consists of two coils made of copper tubing and a compressor. The heating unit is placed outdoor and transmitting heat via the two compression coils from the outside. This heat can then be distributed to radiators used to store hot water or under-floor heating.

 

Here are the things you need to check when buying a Heat Pump:

  • Insulate first starting with your floor and ceiling. In this way, you can pick a smaller heat pump, and your home will be less expensive to warm and cool efficiently.
  • Ensure that it is properly sized for the space you want to heat. In the event that it’s too small, it will need to work harder and cost you more to run.
  • Ensure that it is well fitted. Ask the installer if they adhere with the EECA Best practice guide to heat pump installation.
  • Choose trusted brand for superior quality from a reputable supplier that provides at least a 5-year warranty on labor and parts.
  • Be sure to pick the one that’s right for your climate for when the temperature drops, so does the efficiency of many heat pumps. A high-quality unit that is measured and fitted well should perform efficiently down to minus 15°C. In case you need your heat pump to work at these temperatures, ask assistance from your heat pump supplier.
  • Ensure that it’s right for your environment. In coastal areas or geothermal areas, it is necessary for heat pumps to have proper protection against corrosion. Refer to your supplier about environmental concerns in your area.